Can changes in hoof wall temperature and digital pulse pressure be used to predict laminitis onset?

  • Honoria Brown Cambridge University Veterinary School, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ES

Published:

2019-10-16

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.18849/ve.v4i4.253

Abstract

PICO question

In horses and ponies at risk of laminitis, does the use of hoof wall temperature and digital pulse pressure as diagnostic techniques for acute laminitis provide a method of detecting acute laminitis in the prodromal stage?

Clinical bottom line

  • A palpable bilateral increase in forelimb hoof temperature maintained for longer than half a day may indicate that the horse is 18–­24 hours from acute laminitis onset.
  • A period of increased digital pulse may also be expected up to 11 hours prior to onset.
  • Further studies using larger and more representative cohorts are required to confirm the accuracy of the times at which such changes can be expected.

 

Open Access Peer Reviewed

Author Biography

Honoria Brown, Cambridge University Veterinary School, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ES

Clinical Veterinary Medicine Student

References

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Vol. 4 No. 4 (2019): The fourth issue of 2019

Section: Knowledge Summaries

Categories :  Small Animal  /  Dogs  /  Cats  /  Rabbits  /  Production Animal  /  Cattle  /  Sheep  /  Pig  /  Equine  / 

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